50 or More Students, One Class: The New Reality for Some K-12 Teachers – Teaching Now

Talking about the presidential election is a regular part of the job for government, social studies, and civics teachers. This year, though, many may find themselves fielding questions about a possible outcome they’ve never discussed before. 

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump was asked in a press conference whether he would commit to a peaceful transfer of power after the election. 

“We’re going to have to see what happens,” Trump said. “You know that I’ve been complaining very strongly about the ballots, and the ballots are a disaster.” (Trump has railed against mail-in voting, making the unfounded claim that it will

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Posted on 6 days ago

Does Social Studies Build Stronger Readers? A New Study Suggests So – Teaching Now

Talking about the presidential election is a regular part of the job for government, social studies, and civics teachers. This year, though, many may find themselves fielding questions about a possible outcome they’ve never discussed before. 

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump was asked in a press conference whether he would commit to a peaceful transfer of power after the election. 

“We’re going to have to see what happens,” Trump said. “You know that I’ve been complaining very strongly about the ballots, and the ballots are a disaster.” (Trump has railed against mail-in voting, making the unfounded claim that it will

Read More

Posted on 6 days ago

4 Tips for Building Relationships With Remote Students You’ve Never Met – Teaching Now

Talking about the presidential election is a regular part of the job for government, social studies, and civics teachers. This year, though, many may find themselves fielding questions about a possible outcome they’ve never discussed before. 

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump was asked in a press conference whether he would commit to a peaceful transfer of power after the election. 

“We’re going to have to see what happens,” Trump said. “You know that I’ve been complaining very strongly about the ballots, and the ballots are a disaster.” (Trump has railed against mail-in voting, making the unfounded claim that it will

Read More

Posted on 6 days ago

Trump, the Peaceful Transition of Power, and How to Explain It to Students – Teaching Now

Talking about the presidential election is a regular part of the job for government, social studies, and civics teachers. This year, though, many may find themselves fielding questions about a possible outcome they’ve never discussed before. 

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump was asked in a press conference whether he would commit to a peaceful transfer of power after the election. 

“We’re going to have to see what happens,” Trump said. “You know that I’ve been complaining very strongly about the ballots, and the ballots are a disaster.” (Trump has railed against mail-in voting, making the unfounded claim that it will

Read More

Posted on 6 days ago

Free Digital Citizenship Guides for Parents and Teachers

Whether you’re teaching in person or virtually, how can you help kids develop happy and healthy online habits? Good news! We’ve partnered with our friends at Messenger Kids, our favorite family messaging app, to create free digital citizenship guides for teachers and families with kids in grades K–8.

Just submit your email here  to get your free teacher guide to save or print, plus a free family guide to email and share with families.

Here’s a sneak peek of what you’ll find in our free guide for teachers:

  • Role-playing scenarios for tough tech moments
  • Resources for teaching digital citizenship
  • Ways

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What It’s Really Like Teaching In Person and Online at the Same Time

I have a classroom of 37 high school students staring at me. My breath is coming faster, making my mask humid and hot. My current lesson is tanking and out of the corner of my eye, I can see my unread email count growing higher and higher. Emails from my online students, most likely about an activity that isn’t working or an assignment they can’t access.

Lessons going wrong is no big deal. It happens all the time, even for experienced teachers. I’m good on my feet, and usually, my students have no idea I’m working on the fly.

However,

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Synchronous Vs. Asynchronous Learning: There’s No Perfect Answer

One of the biggest debates we’ve seen since remote learning started is how much time kids should spend doing synchronous vs. asynchronous work. Schools need to find a blend of both learning types that works for their population and needs. There is no magic formula or perfect balance. What’s most important is providing flexibility and equity for students and their caregivers.  We looked to education experts to answer some of our most pressing questions given the level and scale of what teachers can try and implement this school year.

1. One size doesn’t fit all

If there is no formula

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This Isn’t What We Meant By Hybrid Learning–WeAreTeachers

This week I met with one of the teachers I coach. It was our first session of the 2020 school year. I knew she was teaching in person and online at the same time. So, I asked her to describe her schedule in the hopes of learning more. Here’s what this teacher is dealing with every day (I know she isn’t the only one and she gave me permission to share her story).

This is Hybrid Teaching in 2020

She doesn’t know which students will be in person or online. If one of her kids isn’t feeling well, they have

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