50 or More Students, One Class: The New Reality for Some K-12 Teachers – Teaching Now

Talking about the presidential election is a regular part of the job for government, social studies, and civics teachers. This year, though, many may find themselves fielding questions about a possible outcome they’ve never discussed before. 

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump was asked in a press conference whether he would commit to a peaceful transfer of power after the election. 

“We’re going to have to see what happens,” Trump said. “You know that I’ve been complaining very strongly about the ballots, and the ballots are a disaster.” (Trump has railed against mail-in voting, making the unfounded claim that it will

Read More

Posted on 6 days ago

Does Social Studies Build Stronger Readers? A New Study Suggests So – Teaching Now

Talking about the presidential election is a regular part of the job for government, social studies, and civics teachers. This year, though, many may find themselves fielding questions about a possible outcome they’ve never discussed before. 

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump was asked in a press conference whether he would commit to a peaceful transfer of power after the election. 

“We’re going to have to see what happens,” Trump said. “You know that I’ve been complaining very strongly about the ballots, and the ballots are a disaster.” (Trump has railed against mail-in voting, making the unfounded claim that it will

Read More

Posted on 6 days ago

4 Tips for Building Relationships With Remote Students You’ve Never Met – Teaching Now

Talking about the presidential election is a regular part of the job for government, social studies, and civics teachers. This year, though, many may find themselves fielding questions about a possible outcome they’ve never discussed before. 

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump was asked in a press conference whether he would commit to a peaceful transfer of power after the election. 

“We’re going to have to see what happens,” Trump said. “You know that I’ve been complaining very strongly about the ballots, and the ballots are a disaster.” (Trump has railed against mail-in voting, making the unfounded claim that it will

Read More

Posted on 6 days ago

Trump, the Peaceful Transition of Power, and How to Explain It to Students – Teaching Now

Talking about the presidential election is a regular part of the job for government, social studies, and civics teachers. This year, though, many may find themselves fielding questions about a possible outcome they’ve never discussed before. 

On Wednesday, President Donald Trump was asked in a press conference whether he would commit to a peaceful transfer of power after the election. 

“We’re going to have to see what happens,” Trump said. “You know that I’ve been complaining very strongly about the ballots, and the ballots are a disaster.” (Trump has railed against mail-in voting, making the unfounded claim that it will

Read More

Posted on 6 days ago

A Survival Guide for Distance Teaching

Teaching in the Online Classroom: Surviving and Thriving in the New Normal
by Doug Lemov and the Teach Like a Champion Team
Jossey-Bass, 2020, $19.95; 192 pages.

As reviewed by Kathleen Porter-Magee

In this age of ever-increasing polarization, it wouldn’t surprise me if Teaching in the Online Classroom gets ensnared in a debate about education reform or compared to the caricature critics paint of instruction in high-performing charter schools. But that diversion would miss so much of what the book has to offer and what its talented team of editors and authors have done from their perch at Teach Like

Read More

Does Social Studies Build Stronger Readers? A New Study Suggests So – Teaching Now

A new study suggests that elementary students who spend more time on social studies become better readers.

The report from the Thomas B. Fordham Institute found that spending 30 minutes a day more on social studies is correlated with better reading comprehension. The study doesn’t prove that the first causes the second. But it adds to a long stream of discussion about the role that background knowledge and subject-specific vocabulary can play when children are learning to read.

The study uses a federal database that tracks 18,000 children who were kindergarten students in 2010-11 until they completed 5th grade. The

Read More

4 Tips for Building Relationships With Remote Students You’ve Never Met – Teaching Now

As millions of students start the school year remotely, many of them have never met their teachers in person. 

Yet strong student-teacher relationships are linked to both short-term and long-term improvements on multiple measures: higher student academic engagement, better attendance, better grades, fewer disruptive behaviors and suspensions, and lower school dropout rates. These effects hold true regardless of students’ individual, family, and school backgrounds. And experts say strong relationships will be even more important this year, as many students grapple with trauma brought on by the pandemic, the economic downturn, and recent high-profile police killings of Black people.


See

Read More

COVID Metrics Are Rising. Schools Are Going Back Anyway.

In early September, after two weeks of remote learning, five parents in Charlotte, NC sued the district to return to in-person school. The lawsuit sparked debate over when, how, and why the district should transitioning back into buildings.

By the end of September, even with the district in Yellow, the Charlotte school board was moving to bring students back into school buildings.

Charlotte is not the only district that is quickly shifting from remote to in-person instruction, all while 33 states have high enough COVID rates to limit travel, according to the Harvard Global Health Institute risk assessment map.

Read More