50 Easy Science Experiments You Can Do With Household Items


You don’t need special equipment or a PhD to get kids excited about science. These easy science experiments are a snap to pull together, using household items you already have on hand. Let the learning—and fun—begin! (As always, take proper safety precautions and provide adult supervision as needed.)

1. Build a da Vinci bridge.

There are plenty of bridge-building experiments out there, but this one is unique. It’s inspired by Leonardo da Vinci’s 500 year-old self-supporting wooden bridge. Learn how to build it at the link, and expand your learning by exploring more about da Vinci himself.

Learn more: iGame Mom

2. Grow a carbon sugar snake.

Outside Science Carbon Snake Kiwico

Easy science experiments can still have impressive results! This eye-popping chemical reaction demonstration only requires simple supplies like sugar, baking soda, and sand. 

Learn more: Kiwico

3. Create eggshell chalk.

Easy Science Experiments

Eggshells contain calcium, the same material that makes chalk. Grind them up and mix them with flour, water, and food coloring to make your very own sidewalk chalk.

Learn more: Kidspot

4. Become a human sundial.

Outside Science Sundial Scholastic

Use that homemade chalk for this activity that turns kids into human sundials! They’ll practice measuring skills and learn about the movement of the sun across the sky.

Learn more: Scholastic

5. Learn about plant transpiration.

Easy Science Experiments

Your backyard is a terrific place for easy science experiments! Grab a plastic bag and rubber band to learn how plants get rid of excess water they don’t need, a process known as transpiration.

Learn more: Teach Beside Me

6. Make naked eggs.

This is so cool! Use vinegar to dissolve the calcium carbonate in an eggshell to discover the membrane underneath that holds the egg together. Then, use the “naked” egg for another easy science experiment that demonstrates osmosis.

Learn more: Making Memories With Your Kids

7. Make sparks with steel wool.

Easy Science Experiments

All you need is steel wool and a 9-volt battery to perform this science demo that’s bound to make their eyes light up! Kids learn about chain reactions, chemical changes, and more.

Learn more: The Homeschool Scientist

8. Turn milk into plastic.

6th Grade Science

This sounds a lot more complicated than it is, but don’t be afraid to give it a try. Use simple kitchen supplies to create plastic polymers from plain old milk. Sculpt them into cool shapes when you’re done!

Learn more: Science Buddies

9. Levitate a ping-pong ball.

Easy Science Experiments

Kids will get a kick out of this experiment, which is really all about Bernoulli’s principle. You only need plastic bottles, bendy straws, and ping-pong balls to make the science magic happen.

Learn more: Steve Spangler Science

10. Launch a two-stage rocket.

6th Grade Science

The rockets used for space flight generally have more than one stage to give them the extra boost they need. This easy science experiment uses balloons to model a two-stage rocket launch, teaching kids about the laws of motion.

Learn more: Science Buddies

11. Pull an egg into a bottle.

Easy Science Experiments

This classic easy science experiment never fails to delight. Use the power of air pressure to suck a hard-boiled egg into a jar, no hands required. 

Learn more: Left Brain Craft Brain

12. Test pH using cabbage.

7th Grade Science PH Education Possible

Teach kids about acids and bases without needing pH test strips! Simply boil some red cabbage and use the resulting water to test various substances—acids turn red and bases turn green.

Learn more: Education Possible

13. Learn about capillary action.

Easy Science Experiments

Kids will be amazed as they watch the colored water move from glass to glass, and you’ll love the easy and inexpensive set-up. Gather some water, paper towels, and food coloring to teach the scientific magic of capillary action.

Learn More: 123 Homeschool 4 Me

14. Float a marker man.

Their eyes will pop out of their heads when you “levitate” a stick figure right off the table! This experiment works due to the insolubility of dry-erase marker ink in water, combined with the lighter density of the ink.

Learn more: Gizmodo

15. Demonstrate the “magic” leakproof bag.

Easy Science Experiments

So simple and so amazing! All you need is a zip-top plastic bag, sharp pencils, and some water to blow your kids’ minds. Once they’re suitably impressed, teach them how the “trick” works by explaining the chemistry of polymers.

Learn more: Steve Spangler Science

16. Clean some old coins.

Use common household items to make old oxidized coins clean and shiny again in this simple chemistry experiment. Ask kids to predict (hypothesize) which will work best, then expand the learning by doing some research to explain the results.

Learn more: Gallykids

17. Expand a balloon … without blowing.

Easy Science Experiments

Chances are good you probably did easy science experiments like this when you were in school yourself. This well-known activity demonstrates the reactions between acids and bases. Fill a bottle with vinegar and a balloon with baking soda. Fit the balloon over the top, shake the baking soda down into the vinegar, and watch the balloon inflate.

Learn more: All for the Boys

18. Discover density with hot and cold water.

5th Grade Science

There are a lot of easy science experiments you can do with density. This one is extremely simple, involving only hot and cold water and food coloring, but the visuals make it appealing and fun.

Learn more: STEAMsational

19. Learn to layer liquids.

Easy Science Experiments

This density demo is a little more complicated, but the effects are spectacular. Slowly layer liquids like honey, dish soap, water, and rubbing alcohol in a glass. Kids will be amazed when the liquids float one on top of the other like magic (except it is really science).

Learn more: Steve Spangler Science

20. Construct a homemade lava lamp.

5th Grade Science Lava Lamp Educationcom

This 70s trend is back … as an easy science experiment! This activity combines acid/base reactions with density for a totally groovy result.

Learn more: Education.com

21. Whip up a tornado in a bottle.

Easy Science Experiments

There are plenty of versions of this classic experiment out there, but we love this one because it sparkles! Kids learn about a vortex and what it takes to create one.

Learn more: Cool Science Experiments HQ

22. Explore how sugary drinks affect teeth.

7th Grade Science Sugar Eggs Feels Like Home

The calcium content of eggshells makes them a great stand-in for teeth. Use eggs to explore how soda and juice can stain teeth and wear down the enamel. Expand your learning by trying different toothpaste and toothbrush combinations to see how effective they are.

Learn more: Feels Like Home

23. Monitor air pressure with a DIY barometer.

Easy Science Experiments

This simple but effective DIY science project teaches kids about air pressure and meteorology. They’ll have fun tracking and predicting the weather with their very own barometer. 

Learn more: Edventures With Kids

24. Mummify a hotdog.

7th Grade Science Mummification Science Buddies

If your kids are fascinated by the Egyptians, they’ll love learning to mummify a hotdog! No need for canopic jars; just grab some baking soda and get started.

Learn more: Science Buddies

25. Extinguish flames with carbon dioxide.

This is a fiery twist on acid/base experiments. Light a candle and talk about what fire needs to survive. Then, create an acid-base reaction and “pour” the carbon dioxide to extinguish the flame. The CO2 gas acts like a liquid, suffocating the fire.

Learn more: Steve Spangler Science

26. Do the Archimedes squeeze.

It sounds like a wild dance move, but this easy science experiment demonstrates Archimedes’ principle of buoyancy. All you need is aluminum foil and a container of water.

Learn more: Science Buddies

27. Step through an index card.

Third Grade Science Surface Area Steve Spangler

This is one easy science experiment that never fails to astonish. With carefully placed scissor cuts on an index card, you can make a loop large enough to fit a (small) human body through! Kids will be wowed as they learn about surface area.

Learn more: Steve Spangler Science

28. Stand on a pile of paper cups.

Easy Science Experiments

Combine physics and engineering and challenge kids to create a paper cup structure that can support their weight. This is a cool project for aspiring architects.

Learn more: Science Sparks

29. Blow the biggest bubbles you can.

Outside Science Bubbles Scholastic

Add a few simple ingredients to dish soap solution to create the largest bubbles you’ve ever seen! Kids learn about surface tension as they engineer these bubble-blowing wands.

Learn more: Scholastic

30. Mix up saltwater solutions.

Easy Science Experiments

This simple experiment covers a lot of concepts. Learn about solutions, density, and even ocean science as you compare and contrast how objects float in different water mixtures.

Learn more: Science Kiddo

31. Recreate the water cycle in a bag.

2nd Grade Science

You can do so many easy science experiments with a simple zip-top bag! Fill one partway with water and set it on a sunny windowsill to see how the water evaporates up and eventually “rains” down.

Learn more: Grade School Giggles

32. Conduct an egg drop.

Easy Science Experiments

Put all their engineering skills to the test with an egg drop! Challenge kids to build a container from stuff they find around the house that will protect an egg from a long fall (this is especially fun to do from upper-story windows).  

Learn more: Buggy and Buddy 

34. Construct a pair of model lungs. 

Kids get a better understanding of the respiratory system when they build model lungs using a plastic water bottle and some balloons. You can modify the experiment to demonstrate the effects of smoking too.

Learn more: Surviving a Teacher’s Salary

35. Test out parachutes.

Gather a variety of materials (try tissues, handkerchiefs, plastic bags, etc.) and see which ones make the best parachutes. You can also find out how they’re affected by windy days or find out which ones work in the rain.

Learn more: Inspiration Laboratories

36. String up some sticky ice.

Can you lift an ice cube using just a piece of string? This quick experiment teaches you how. Use a little salt to melt the ice and then refreeze the ice with the string attached.

Learn more: Playdough to Plato

37. Experiment with limestone rocks.

Outside Science Rocks KCEdventures

Kids love to collect rocks, and there are plenty of easy science experiments you can do with them. In this one, pour vinegar over a rock to see if it bubbles. If it does, you’ve found limestone!

Learn more: Edventures with Kids

38. Recycle newspaper into an engineering challenge.

Easy Science Experiments

It’s amazing how a stack of newspapers can spark such creative engineering. Challenge kids to build a tower, support a book, or even build a chair using only newspaper and tape!

Learn more: STEM Activities for Kids

39. Build a solar oven.

Outside Science Solar Oven Desert Chica

Explore the power of the sun when you build your own solar ovens and use them to cook some yummy treats. This experiment takes a little more time and effort, but the results are always impressive. The link below has complete instructions.

Learn more: Desert Chica

40. Turn a bottle into a rain gauge.

Easy Science Experiments

All you need is a plastic bottle, a ruler, and a permanent marker to make your own rain gauge. Monitor your measurements and see how they stack up against meteorology reports in your area.

Learn More: NurtureStore

41. Use rubber bands to sound out acoustics.

5th Grade Science

Explore the ways that sound waves are affected by what’s around them using a simple rubber band “guitar.” (Kids absolutely love playing with these!)

Learn more: Science Sparks

42. Send secret messages with invisible ink.

3rd Grade Science Invisible Ink Steve Spangler

Turn your kids into secret agents! Write messages with a paintbrush dipped in lemon juice, then hold the paper over a heat source and watch the invisible become visible as oxidation goes to work.

Learn more: Steve Spangler Science

43. Build a folded mountain.

Easy Science Experiments

This clever demonstration helps kids understand how some landforms are created. Use layers of towels to represent rock layers and boxes for continents. Then pu-u-u-sh and see what happens!

Learn more: The Chaos and the Clutter

44. Play catch with a catapult.

Catapults make fun and easy science experiments, but we like the twist on this one that challenges kids to create a “receiver” to catch the soaring object on the other end.

Learn more: Science Buddies 

45. Take a Play-Doh core sample.

Learn about the layers of the Earth by building them out of Play-Doh, take a core sample with a straw. (Love Play-Doh? Get more learning ideas here.)

Learn more: Line Upon Line Learning

46. Project the stars on your ceiling.

Use the video lesson in the link below to learn why stars are only visible at night. Then create a DIY star projector to explore the concept hands-on.

Learn more: Mystery Science

47. Build a better umbrella.

Easy Science Experiments

Challenge students to engineer the best possible umbrella from various household supplies. Encourage them to plan, draw blueprints, and test their creations, using the scientific method.

Learn more: Raising Lifelong Learners

48. Make it rain.

Use shaving cream and food coloring to simulate clouds and rain. This is an easy science experiment little ones will beg to do over and over.

Learn more: Mrs. Jones’ Creation Station

49. Use water to “flip” a drawing.

Light refraction causes some really cool effects, and there are multiple easy science experiments you can do with it. This one uses refraction to “flip” a drawing; you can also try the famous “disappearing penny” trick.

Learn more: Go Science Kids

50. Crystallize your own rock candy.

Crystal science experiments teach kids about supersaturated solutions. This one is easy to do at home, and the results are absolutely delicious!

Learn more: Growing a Jeweled Rose 

Looking for even more science fun? Get the best science experiments for every grade K-8 here.

Plus check out the best science websites for elementary school and middle and high school.

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